Theoretical phonetics lectures

Theoretical phonetics. Lectures.

Lecture №1

Introduction
The plan
a brief historical outline
the role of phonetics in foreign language teaching
Phonetics as a branch of linguistics. Its application to the other areas of science
branches of phonetics
aspe
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·(в рамках) of grammar. Even nowadays the first chapter of Russian grammar is called phonetics. The first meaningful record of a serious phonetic investigation was made in the 4th B.C. Mr. Panini may be considered to be the 1st phonetician. He __________ and described very old even for him texts which are called Vedas and Rig-Vedas. They were large collection of old religious ____________ (ведические гимны). They were written in a kind of a language prior to Sanskrit and he had to decipher (расшифровывать) t
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
We see that the symbols are the same in 2 columns, they differ only in length.
Vassiliev introduced a different type. He added 4 symbols:

·,
·,
·,
·
His transcription is considered to be a powerful vision aid. It is appreciated by British phoneticians. Sounds i:–I,
·:–
·, u:–u,
·:–
· are different not only in length but also in quality, and different quality should be associated with different symbols. From this point of view Vassiliev’s transcription is more adequate. The leading phonetician Gimson followed Vassiliev’s transcription in his additions of the pronounce dictionary.

it gives a special symbol for every allophone or variant of the same phoneme: l-
·; p-ph

broad transcription is used for teaching, narrow for research














·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·e (взрывной)
Alveolar
Fortis (voiceless)
Aspirated
Forlingual
Apical
Occlusive
Allophones of this phoneme:
principal [t
·:]
does not differ from the isolated
subsidiary
[ti:] – Slightly palatalized
[let р
·m] – Dental
[tra
·,tri:] – Post-alveolar
[n
·t kwa
·t] – No plosion
[n
·t l
·tl] – Lateral plosion
[ste
·] – Not aspirated
[twa
·s] – Labialized

What characteristic features are common to all these allophones?
voiceless
occlusive
Forlingual
This is the bundle of distinctive features
We should b
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·:n] the meaning changes
Fortis – lenis [t
·:n-d
·:n]
Occlusive – constrictive [ti:-si:]

The bundle of these features is called the invariant of the phoneme
The relationship between the phoneme and its allophone is the relation between what is abstrac
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·istic function of the phoneme is to distinguish the meaning:
morphemes [sli:p
·-sli:p
·]
words [pe
·-be
·]
sentence []

the phoneme performs its distinctive functions through the opposition of the articulatory feature which constitute the invariant. This fact
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·nctive). Let’s prove that “Fortis-lenis” is relevant (важный, значимый)
[h
·:d h
·:t] this is a phonological opposition (the meaning is different, the features are relevant)


types of mistakes

There are two types of mistakes: phonetic and phonological. It is very important to observe the difference between them. If we change the relevant feature, the mistake is called phonological. Here we substitute (заменяем) an allophone of one phoneme by an allophone of a different phoneme:
[
·ri: tri:] the place of articulation is different
[
·] - interdental
[t] - alveolar

The manner of noise production:
[
·] - fricative
[t] - occlusive

If the speaker substitutes an allophone of some phoneme by another allophone, the mistake is called phonetic
[let
·р
·m] the sound “t” is alveolar or dental
[
·i:i:p] – Over lengthened [i:]


the Phoneme Theory at Home and Abroad

The number of definitions of the phoneme is numerous. Not all of them proceed from (исходят) the fact that the phoneme has 3 aspects. The definitions differ
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·hich was not an exception. It was a psychological conception. He underestimated (недооценивать, преуменьшать) the material nature of the phoneme and carried to the extreme its abstract nature. According to this conception a phoneme does not exist objectively (реально). He used to say that phonemes exist only in the mind of the speaker. He said that the speech sounds were fictitious (воображаемые, выдуманные) units, inventions of scholars.

Thus, according to this conception, actually pronounced speech sounds are imperfect (несовершенны) to realization of ideal psychical images (психологические эквиваленты). His conception is idealistic because he proceeds from the phoneme existing in the mind but not in reality.

I. A. Baudowind de Courtenay’s concept was
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·звукотипы) up to the 30s until his book “A manual of French Phonetics” appeared. There he gave a truly materialistic conception of the phoneme.
Scherba describes the phoneme as “звуковые типы, способные в противопоставлении дифференцировать слова и их формы, каждая фонема определяется тем общим (инвариантом), что отличает ее от других фонем того же языка. Реально произносимые звуки являются тем частным, в котором реализуется общее (фонема) и называются оттенками, аллофонами фонемы”

This definition gives us a good ground for the conception of the phoneme shared our contemporary linguists. Among them are: V. A. Vasiliev, Бондарка, Торсуев, Соколова.

Most of the linguists look upon the phoneme as one of the basic linguistic units capable of distinguishing wor
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
· Богумил Трынка, Богуслав Гавранеа, Йозеф Вахек, Р.О. Якобсон, Трубецкойthey were interested in how the phoneme fulfill its distinctive functions. They considered the phoneme to be a bundle of distinctive features. They were interested in singling out rele
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·“фонема не есть что-то звучащее, но нечто бестелесное, образуемое не своей материальной субстанцией, а исключительно теми различиями, которые отделяют ее звуковой образ от других”

The characteristic feature of the American interpretation of the phoneme is
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·признавать, допускать) that the term and the concept were introduced by Scherba in 1911. He regards the phoneme as a family of related sounds as a mere sum of sounds which are more or less alike. This concept is vulgarly-materialistic.

Let’s prove it. The
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
· Трубецкой «Phonology»

semantically-distributional method attaches great significance to the meaning. This method consists in substitution of a sound for another sound in order to find out how it affects the meaning.
The procedure is called the commutation (изменение, смена, замещение) test. This is the method of opposition. It is referred to as a method of commutation. The method consists in establishing minimal pairs of words. By a minimal pair we mean a pair of words which are differentiated by only one sound in the same position. The possible results of the commutation test are:
if the substitution (замена) leads to the change of meaning that is a different word or a different grammatical form appears, then the opposed sounds are the allophones of diff
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·носовой n] is never used in the beginning

The other method is called the substitutional, or formally distributional method, as the term suggests, it implied a substitution procedure: we take a word, make a substitution and see what will happen. This method was employed by American descriptivist when he the language of the Indians in America. They supposed the meaning could not always be taken into consideration, they gave the following example: ШКАФ-ШКАП – the sounds are di
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·[], луг-лук [k]
When we analyze these examples, the question: weather the allophones are of the same or different phoneme?

There are two schools of thought that approach this problem in the opposite ways

Moscow school (morphological) петр савич кузнецов, а.а. реформатский, р.и. аванесов
It came to the existence in the 20th . they state that the phonemic contents are constant and cannot vary. In establishing the phonetic status of the sound they preceded from the theory of strong or weak position.

A st
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·[] are of the same phoneme, лук- луга – morphemes are different, allophones belong to different phonemes.

the Leningrad school (scherba’s school) applied in practice scherba’s ideas: л.р зиндер, м.и. матусевич, л.в. бондаренко, в.а. васильев.

The statu
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·[ different, лук-луг – the same

Pro. And cons.
Moscow: + 1. phonemic changes are not analyzed apart from the morpheme . the form and the meaning make a dialectical unity
+ 2. it is natural that all of the same phoneme sound different [dog - laid], in first case – [d] is voiced, in the second – partially devoiced
1. sometimes it is impossible to find a strong position for the sound: корова, корзина, собака [decorate]
2. the difference between the allophones of the same phoneme appears to be too stron
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·ел-ель the articulation is the same the meaning is different)
If we do not consider the morphological principles we can fail in establishing the phonetic contents of the word.
+ its seeming simplicity







Lecture № 3
Organs of speech. Articulatory pho
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·(дыхательное горло). Its function is to regulate the procedure of the air and produce the air stream. Responsible for the production of the force component
is used to produce voice or pitch or musical tone. Includes the larynx with the vocal cords on it. Th
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·(колебание) of the vocal cords produces oscillation of the air stream. The voice is produced. These periodical oscillations are perceived by the air as voice. The height of the voice depends on the frequency of the vibrations of the vocal cords. The pitch
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·обертон). The function is to modify the overtones and to produce vowel sounds. The shape and the volume of the resonator may be different. Resonator is formed by the mouth cavity, the pharynx and the nasal cavity. For example, the sound [лягушка] – the sou
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·свидетельствовать) to the fact. The scholars of the last century took it for granted that vowel length in English is relevant. And no one ever attempted to question it. They acknowledged 3 degrees of vowel length or 3 types of vowels with respect to their length:
long [s
·:,p
·:,ka:,ba:]
half-long [pi:k,pa:t]
short [p
·n,p
·t]

later on 4 degrees wore introduced because i: in [di:d] is much longer than in [di:p]

by the degrees of length, not the historical, but rather the position of a vowel in a word was taken into account. Thus vowels were grouped into the following patterns
an open syllable – the longest vowel [p
·:]
before sonorant – shorter but long enough [si:n, di:n, ri:l,
·:l]
before voiced consonants [di:d, si:d]
before voiceless consonants [si:t], [sit
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·l length as a disputable question and not to take it for granted. But no matter how accurate these attempts are. It doesn’t follow that vowel length is redundant (чрезмерный) characteristic feature. There is not yet enough prove because this difference in
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
· , u:
·,
·:
·

if we think that the difference is in length, it is wrong. They are different in the matter of quality. I: is a diphthong not a monophthong . it is more accurate to make is “ij”

so they are qualitatively different vowels.

Another pair is u:
·. There is no opposition as they belong to different groups.

·:
· (шуа occurs only and exclusively in unstressed positions, другой almost never loses much of its quality)

they never occur in the same position. Thus this opposition doesn’t work either. They are sounds of different planes.


·:
· it is very arbitrary (случайно) kind of opposition. It is more relevant hidtorically and phonologically to appose
·: to ж. More over [
·] and more over occurs as [шуа]


·:
· it is the only pair that may seem to be right. But it does not work either because perceptual phonetic findings show that if we reduce the degree of length in
·: it will be perceived by the natives of the English as
·.

Consequently this opposition with the reference to the length does npt wo
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·: на
·:

Some people used to say that the difference in length is nothing else but the manifestation of differences in the degree of tenseness. Long vowels are tense and short vowels are lax. And the main feature for length difference is the difference in the degree of tenseness.

In fact this hardly the case in English. British phoneticians supply examples to prove that English vowels are very flexible in the matter of prolongation (продолжение). And it was a wrong idea that tenseness brings length _______________________vice versa.

A more sound approached to the problem is to regard it into the context of syllable structure. If the vowel is regarded as a constituent (компонент) of a syllable it depends on a kind of a contiguity (близость, примыкание) of a consonant which adjoins it.

According to the theory vowels can be checked and unchecked. In the course of its historical development vowel quantitative correlation changed into the so-called checked-unchecked syllabic correlation. Thus from this stand point that vowel length is a redundant (чрезмерный) characteristic, it is not relevant.

But we must not assume that this is the end point in the development of the English vocalic system.

We know that the pronunciation of a language is subj
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
· t - pi:t
·
·p -
·i:p.

It is vowel quality which differentiates the meaning. In the position before voiceless consonants historical long and short vowels are of equal length. [bi:d-b
·d,s
·d-si:d]

Here the vowels are before voiced consonants. Before voicel
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·mportant to teach syllabication.

In modern English there is a new tendency to which vowel length become relevant again someday [lжt
· - lжd
·] latter-ladder

The problem is connected with the pronunciation of consonants in their vocalic positions. There is
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·] wh

Some linguists say that there are 2 consonant phonemes in English when we have “wh” in spelling. If we oppose them, we can see that this opposition differentiates the meaning. Our linguists consider them to be one and the same phoneme.
[
·] it is mainly used in literary style. Most English speakers pronounce only [
·]

According to Jones’ dictionary [
·] is used in all variants

[
·-
·]

According to our textbooks there are 2 affricates in English. Affricate is a phoneme consisting of 2 consonant elements. According to British linguists there are 6 affricates [
·,
·,
·,
·,tr,dr]

When must sound combination be treated as uniphonemic?

they must stand a whole in a phoneme opposition
belong to the same morpheme and syllable
the articulation must be shifting

[
·,
·] [
·ein-mein-sein] -
· stands as a whole and belongs to the same syllable.

There are cases when similar combinations consist of 2 phonemes [k
·:t
·
·p] – different syllables, articulation is not shifting.

[
·-
·] not quite clear
[kж
·-be
·] – may be either the plural form. Belong to different morphemes (s,z - endings), but the syllable is the same.

There are no affricates like them in English

There is no [y] in Russian, the Greek word [z
·:]. If there were such an affricate, it would be pronounced as [
·
·:]

·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·:]
The combination stands as a whole in this opposition, they belong to the same syllable and morpheme
[`p
·
·lr
·] – the sound combination [
·
·] belongs to 1 syllable and morpheme even when add an extra morpheme [r
·], [
·
·] doesn’t fall apart, the articulation is shifting. There are similar combinations when these vowels fall apart and belong to different syllables and morphemes
[fju: - fju:] [influ
·nts - influ
·nt
·l] there are 2 morphemes and two different syllables

a neutral vowel

is a neutral sound a phoneme or is it an unstressed allophone of some other phoneme?
If we approach from the point of view of the phonological Moscow school, there are two cases:
when the neutral vowel can be opposed to some other morpheme
[`
·:mi-`
·:m
·] (armour) the morphemes are different, the meaning is different, that is why the neutral vowel is the separate phoneme
[`
·b
·
·kt -
·b`
·ekt] the morpheme is the same, here [
·] – is an unstressed allophone of [
·]

According to the Leningrad school, [
·] is always an independent phoneme, because it sounds different




New tendencies of pronunciation

5 groups of changes in present day English:

a change may consist simply in the replacement of one phoneme by another. In Northern English they pronounce [m
·nde
·]
according to the British norm they used to pronounce [m
·nd
·], in dictionary [m
·nde
·] is the first variant
a phoneme may disappear from a word completely, or it may disappear regularly from certain position: knight, knee
a phoneme or the member of the phoneme can change in quality
ME i: > NE ai life
ME u > NE
· dull
there may be changes in the whole phonemic structure. New phonemes may appear, other may disappear
OE [
·,р] one allophones of the phoneme
ME they are separate: thing – thy
prosodic changes (in stress and intonation). In present century a number of two-syllabic words have had the stress moved from the second syllable to the first: adult, ally (друг, союзник)


vowel changes

isolated changes
they take place in respective (соответствующий) of the phoneme position, occupied by the phoneme. The quality of some sounds changes:

[
·]
In 1932 Jones characterized the sound as half-open rather retracting (продвинутый назад). In 1964 Charles Barbar considered this phoneme to be more retracted, opened, central, forward, lower
k
·p - b
·t
·

[
·:] [l
·:t -
·
·:t]
used to be retracted and rather opened, it became less open, and the tongue is much higher


[ai]
For Jones it was a frank diphthong. Barbar considers the phoneme more retracted, where the element [a] is a back element

The centripetal tendency
[e] develops towards the position of [
·]
[
·] loses lip rounding and moves to [
·], as [
·]
[bout] – [b
·
·t]

combinative changes
take place in certain phonetic contexts
[
·:] > [
·] before voiceless [t, s.
·] – soft, often, cloth
In early ME these words had a short [
·]. In the 17th century it became lengthened before [t, s.
·], the long forms were fashionable in the 18 century. Now the original form is becoming predominant

[ju:] > [u:] preceded by [
·,
·,r,l]
This change has been going on since the 17th century. There is an intermediate group though both forms are heard.

After [s] [su:t – sju:t]
[
·`sju:m – su:m]
[k
·n`sju:m – su:m]
After [
·] [in`
·ju:ziжzm - `
·u:]
After [z] [ri`zju:m – `zu:m]
Initial [l] [,lu:k`w
·:m]
[`lu:n
·tik – `lju:]
Medial [l] [,жbs
·`lu:t – `lju:t]

This process is more advanced in American English
Dubious - сомнительный AE [`du:bi
·s – `dju:]
BE [dju:bi
·s]

Diphthongization [i:], [u:]

Jones thought them to be pure vowels (organs not more). As a pure vowel [u:] has a closer lip-rounding and a narrower jaw-opening. Barbar says that this sound is diphthongized, speech organs change their position:
[u+u] > [
·+u] > [
·+u] – a substandard variant

In the course of diphthongization the lip-rounding is tightened , jaw-opening is narrowed.

In the pronouncing of the sound [i:] the organs of speech move from:
[i+i] > [i+j] > [
·+j] – a substandard variant


monophthongization – the process of smoothing of diphthong. They become more like pure vowel, the glide is slight

[ei] – say, play [e.i+i]
[ai, a
·] – tend to be smoothed when followed by [
·] the central element is lost:
[ta
·
· - ta
· - ta:]
[fai
· - fa
· - fa:]


5. fial [i] > [i:], [
·] – pronounced closer and longer
[`priti – `priti:, `prit
·]
RP speaker tend to make final [i] into an open sound. Occasionally [i] is replaced in other positions
[bi`twi:n – bi:`twi:n] [i`levn – i:`levn] substandard [
·i]
[i
·] > [i+
·]
[
·
·] > [
·+
·]
Nausea [`n
·:si
·] [`n
·:si+
·] – spelling pronunciation

the influence of dark [l] in [
·lt,
·lv,
·:lt]
[
·], [
·:] > [
·
·]
Salt [s
·:lt, s
·lt]

the spread of [
·] in unstressed syllables. Alternative forms of vowels in unstressed syllables:
system [`sist
·m - tim]
corridor [`k
·rid
·:] [`k
·r
·d
·]

boxes BE [`b
·ksiz] – AE [`b
·ks
·z]
ended BE[`endid] - AE [`end
·d]

In vowel length
[i] – big, his
[
·] – good
[
·] – come lengthening
[e] – bed
[ж] – man

Length is frequent in monosyllabic words which a voiced consonant.

Jones: all adjectives ending in “ad” are long. He suggests that this is the first stage of
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·] became diphthongs [ai] [a
·]


Consonants changes
Assimilation – a process by which a sound is altered through the influence of a neighboring sound. The sound which is influenced becomes phonetically more like the sound exerting the influence. There are various miscellaneous (смешанный) sources of _____________________ changes.
historical assimilation
took place earlier, [ж] changed under the influence of [w]

devoicing
[z] – [s] news – newspaper
[d] – [t] amidst [
·`midst - `midst]
in compound words
tenpence [`tenp
·nts - `temp
·nts]
football - not registered

in rapid familiar speech
give me [`gimmi]

coalescing _____
[dj -
·] due
[tj -
·] Tuesday, tube
[sj -
·] issue [i
·u: - isju:]

new weak forms
many English words have forms which occur in unstressed position, rapid speech
that’s right [srait]
that’s funny [s`f
·ni]
what does he want [`w
·ts hi ,w
·nt]

weakening and loss of consonants
final alveolar (t,d,n)
fourtee(n) men – articulated weakly or disappear
ol(d) man
half pas(t) five

loss of plos
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·упрощение) of double consonants: a good deal
Upside down
Lamp past

initial combinations: psychic [saikik]
where [hwere]

loss of [h] in the beginning: he gave him his breakfast

devoicing the consonants [b, d, g] feed [fi:d], rogue [r
·
·
·]

voicing of consonants (intervocalic position) letter AE, vulgar RE [led
·], British [bridi
·]

intrusive (навязчивые) consonants – inserted into the words where they does not exist
[ns] > [nts]
Once [w
·nts], fancy [fжntsi]
[p], [k]
Warmth [w
·:mp
·], length [lenk
·]
intrusive [r] – affect of analogy
here and there [hi
·r
·n р
·
·]
idea(r)and reality


Dialect Mixing

The group of popular pronunciation. It involves the substitution of a long vowel of a diphthong by a short vowel.

Stabilized [`steibilaizd] – [`stж]
Reproduce [ri:pr
·`dju:s] – [`re]

South – Easter dialect
Monday, necklace [`m
·ndi],[`neklis]

Changes of Stress

In words of more than 2 syllables the popular forms are the forms with the main stress on the second syllable: communal [`ju:],
· hospitable [`i:]

In 2 syllabic words the tendency goes the other way, the stress is moved to the 1st:
`garage, adult [`жd
·lt][
·`d
·lt]

Spelling Pronunciation
Forehead [`f
·:hed-`f
·rid]
Often [
·fn-
·ftn]
Toward [t
·w
·:d, tw
·:d, t
·:d] especially common for newly invented words

Continental Pronunciation
Tendency for foreign-looking words
Gala [geil- g
·:l
·]
Faustus [`f
·:st
·s - `fa
·-]

The word which has undergone normal historical processes of English sound-change is made to confirm more closely to the real or imagined pronunciation, its foreign origin. Latin words received new pronunciation. Latin plural endings which are normally anglicized and now relatinized: nuclei [nju:klii:] – [nju:kliei]




































Lecture № 4

Classification of sounds

Vowels and consonants. General information.
There are 2 major classes of sounds which are traditionally distincted by phoneticians in any language: vowels and consonants.
The division is based on the auditory effect. When pronouncing vowels the air stream meet no obstacles on its way from lungs. When pronouncing consonants the air stream meets an obstacle on its way: lips, teeth, tongue etc. So consonants have closed articulation(there is a closure)
Some scientists(Sokolova among them) separate the following groups of sounds according to their sonority:
-vowels (the most sonorous sounds)
-sonorants (voice prevails over noise)
-affricates (consonants consisting of 2 elements)
-plosives (consonant sounds in which a kind of plosure is heard)
-voiceless consonants(consisting of pure noise)
-[h] – the least sonorous sound
2. Principles of articulation
While characterizing the sounds we must take into account the following articulatory properties:
-the position of the organs of speech
-the tension of the organs of speech
-the force of the air-steam
Concerning these items vowels have the following characteristics:
-in production of vowel sounds the articulators don’t come very close together and this causes the absence of closure in mouth cavity
-when pronouncing vowels speech organs are generally tense
-the air-stream coming from lungs is really weak
The consonants are characterized by:
-the fundamental feature of E.consonants is that speech organs make some abstraction to the flow of air
-the main tension of speech organs is concentrated in the place of abstraction.
-the flow of air is generally strong
Historically, separately stands a class of sonorants (semi-vowels, liquids, glides)in which both vowel and consonant characteristics take place.
-in the articulation of sonorants 1 articulator moves close to another but the air-passage is rather large.
-there’s a tension in the place of abstraction, it brings them closer to vowels
All above mentioned makes it logical to concern the classification of vowels and consonants separately.
3.Vowels
Speaking about vowels the following characteristics are to be concerned
-the stability of articulation
E vowel phonemes are divided into 3 sub classes
a)monophtongs (all short and long vowels but i: and u:).the tongue position is stable.
b)diphthongs (consist of 2 vowel elements, the nucleus – the strongest element, the glide – the weaker element)
c)diphthongoids (the tongue moves from one position to another. The change is not very strong, this makes diphthongoids an intermediate group b/w monophthongs and diphthongs)
All R sounds are monophthongs е,ё, ю, я(consonant+vowel)not diphthongs
-position of the tongue
For the sake of convenience this principle is concerned from 2 aspects: horizontal and vertical movements
Horizontal movements
Russian phoneticians (Vassiliev among them )distinguish 5 groups:
1)front i: e ж
2)front-retracted i
3)central
·
·
·:
4)back o: o u:
5)back-advanced u a:
British phoneticians (D Jones) take slightly different approach. They don’t single out front-retracted and back-advanced vowels.
Vertical movements
Russian phoneticians single out 3 classes and 2 variations
Narrow Broad
High/close i: u: i u
Mid/half-open e 3: e
·
·
Low/open
· o: a: ж
British phoneticians single out only 3 classes, no variations.
-lip-rounding. Traditionally 2 lip-positions are distinguished:
a)Round/labialized, lips are active o o:
b)unrounded/neutral, lips are passive e 3
-vowel length/quantity. Vowels are historically short and long o O:
-tenseness. Degree of muscular tension. It characterizes the speech organs when producing a certain vowel sound. All English vowels are lax(short) and tense(long)
-checkness. Only some phoneticians (among them Schevchenko) concentrate on such a feature. According to them short vowels are checked due to glottal activity that releases a quick energy discharge in a short interval of time. Long vowels are unchecked (free), it implies a lower energy discharge over a larger time interval.
Russian vowels are checked. This characteristic makes it difficult for R learners to pronounce the vowels correctly according to their position in a word and to the following consonants.
4. Consonants
They are classified according to these principles:
-as many R phoneticians say, primary importance should be given to the type of abstraction and the manner of noise production. On this ground the following classes are distinguished:
a)constrictive (in the production an incomplete closure is formed) [s z]
b)occlusive(a complete closure is formed)[p b]
c) rolled, thrilled(here belong the sounds in pronunciation of which tongue tip vibrates) Rus [p]
d)affricates(in the production a complete closure turns into incomplete)
-active organs of speech, the place of articulation
E consonants are divided into
a)labial -> bilabial [p b]
-> labio-dental [f v]
b)lingual -> forelingual ->apical [t d ] / cucumnial [r]
->backlingual [k g]
->medialingual [j]
c)glottal [h]
-the work of vocal cords
Scientists single out voiced (when vocal cords are brought together and vibrate [d b v]), the degree of muscular tension is less than in voiceless consonants -> they are called lenis
Voiceless consonants are produced when vocal cords are lax, are taken apart. The degree of muscular tension is greater than in voiced consonants -> they are fortis
Unlike E in the R language all voiced consonants are fortis, voiceless – lenis
-position of soft palate
Consonants
a)nasal [m n] – when the soft palate is lowered and air goes through the nasal cavity
b)oral [l r] – the flow of air goes through mouth cavity
An outstanding British phonetician D Jones gives a different classification of speech sounds
The vertical line – manner of articulation
The horizontal – which articulate

Bilabial
Labio-dental
Dental
Alveolar
Post-alveolar
Palatal
Velar
Glottal

Plosive
P b


T d


K g


Affricate




t
· d3




Fricative

F v

· р
S z

· 3

(x)
h

Nasal
m


n



·


Lateral
approximant



l





Approximant
w



r
j



Sound [(x)] is a special sound used by E speakers in the words of foreign origin esp of German one : Bach [(x)]
Another famous Br phonetician Gimson accepted this classification

































Lecture № 5
English Intonation

In very general term intonation is a specific organization of speech sounds in syllables and words and intended to produce meaningful utterances.

So intonation is something closely related to the sounds. There is a view point that intonation is superimposed from above upon the segments of speech, sounds and syllables, and therefore intonation is often referred to as a super segmental phenomenon.

Nowadays this view is no longer considered to be correct. Experimental data prove the reverse. Intonation is inherent in the segment.

Another more accurate term which is used instead of super segmental is a non-segmental phenomenon or feature. It means that it is different from segment but closely linked with them.

Another word currently used in writings is prosody. It is roughly the same as intonation; we say that intonation is a collection of prosodic features. The two terms intonation and prosody include the same components. But by intonation we mean very many things, that is why the term prosody seems to be much better. It is widely used by linguists, but it is not used in school. When we mean prosody, we mean pitch, loudness and tempo.

Intonation on the perception level is a complex unity of changes in pitch or tone, intensity or accent and tempo, that is the rate of utterance and pausation.

Professor Vasiliev includes the fourth component – timbre, but we know little about it. We can’t measure it. There are no terms to describe it. By voice timbre we mean special colouring of voice, that is why it is excluded from the definition.

Some linguists restrict the term intonation to pitch only. You may come across such an utterance “the sentence is pronounced with such and such intonation” here pitch is meant.

Some linguists associate intonation with accent and pitch. They say that each syllable is characterized by a quite definite pitch level and bares a certain amount of stress.

Intonation on the acoustic level
Pitch correlates with the fundamental frequency of the vibration of the vocal cords, loudness – with the amplitude of vibrations, tempo – with the time during which a speech unit lasts. A sentence or a text without an intonation is non-entirely. A sentence is complete when it is pronounced with a certain kind of intonation. If we apply to the idea of potential syntax then the formula is

Sentence real = sentence potential + intonation

Sentence potential is a collection of words in order. Nowadays the term sentence in reference to intonation is not currently used. The word utterance is more preferable. Intonation group is a group of words which is semantically and syntactically complete. It serves as a carrier of intonation.

Intonation patterns serve to actualize syntagms. Intonation pattern is the smallest intonation unit of speech which is formed by pitch, loudness and tempo.

Let compare the potential and an actualized syntagm.

I think he is coming soon
(a potential) (a potential)

I think he is coming soon (an actualized syntagm)


The anatomy of intonation
Only 1 component – pitch (melody, tone, tune) is given preference when the intonation is analyzed. Sometimes the prominence is taken into account too. It is also correlated with sentence stress, when the entire intonation structure is reduced to pitch sentence stress pattern.

What sections does the intonation group consist of?

Nucleolus (focal point)
The terminal (конечный) tone
tail

head
the pre-nuclear tone
pre-head


tonogram:

he is a very remarkable novelist



the terminal tone (3,4) is the most important. It is made up of two parts: the nuclear tone (3) and the tail (4). The tail can’t change the meaning of the sentence. They form the terminal tone.

Head (2) may be of several types:
Prehead (1) consists of the unstressed syllables preceding the head

Types of terminal tones.

Simple tunes: low fall low rise
High fall high rise
Mid fall mid rise
Mid level
Complex tunes
Fall-rise
Rise-fall
Rise-fall-rise
Compound tunes
Rise+fall
Fall+rise

They are mainly used when the pitch movement is separated by several syllables, not in one or even in two standing side by side. The most important tones are: low fall. High fall, low rise, high rise, fall-rise, mid level

Types of pre-head. They may be present or absent

Zero pre-head
Low pre-head hello, good morning
High pre-head

Types of heads.

The most complicated is a pre-nuclear part, the head. It starts with the first stressed syllable. Very often heads are mixed but for teaching purposes we distinguish the following groups of heads:

Descending
Stepping
Falling
Scandent 2. Ascending
Sliding - rising
- climbing 1. Level
- high
- medium
- fall


Level heads may me:
Low all right!

High who ever saw

Medium what’s your favourite colour?

Descending heads may be:
Falling what did you think of Mary’s flat?


Stepping Alice was beginning to get very tired


Unstressed syllables are on the same level with the preceding stressed syllables

Sliding I’ll get it rewired at once


Scandent and her brother and sister were asleep


Unstressed or partially stressed syllables moved up, pronounced higher than the stressed syllables

Ascending heads may be:
Rising did you tell Vincent about it?
Thank you very much

Here the voice moves up by steps, unstressed or partially stressed syllables continue the rise

Climbing that is too bad said the professor


If the voice moves up by slides unstressed or partially stressed syllables glide up too.

Parts of the intonation can be combined in various ways. The number of possible combinations is more than a hundred. Various combinations express various meanings:

High head not at all!

Low fall calm, reserved


High fall surprised, concerned


Low rise encouraging, very friendly


High rise questioning


Fall-rise protesting, correcting

Not all the combinations are equally important. Some of them occur very seldom. The number of intonation patterns indicates the number of intonation groups. Each intonation group has a communicative centre (semantic centre). This centre conveys the most important part of information which is generally something new. The nucleus of the communicative centre is marked by the terminal tone. The characteristic feature of the terminal tone is to arrange the intonation group semantically and phonetically.

The functions of intonation
To structure the information content of a textual unit
To differentiate the actual meaning of textual units
To structure a text, to define the number of terminal tones
To determine the speech function of a phrase
To convey conotational meaning of “attitude”
Stylistic function of intonation

The functional value of the pitch
Voice pitch and tempo are very closely connected but we’ll discuss them separately. The most evident is the distinctive function of terminal tones. The distinctive function of pitch may be proved by the system of opposition; that is by minimal pairs of sentences and intonation groups of the structure and the same lexical composition. The meaning is differentiated by voice pitch only.
Functions: 1) syntactically-distinctive function (the number of terminal tones indicates the number of syntagm. It may affect the meaning of the sentence)
Лекция № 6
Dialectology
A national language has two material forms: written (the literary language) and spoken (the speech of the nation). Written form is usually a generally accepted standard and is the same throughout the country. Spoken language is not so uniform, it may vary from locality to locality. Such forms are called dialects. There dialects may differ from one another in:
-grammar
-vocabulary
-pronunciation
Dialectology is the branch of phonetics which studies the dialectical differences in pronunciation, the ways language interacts with social reality, language variations caused by social difference and differing social needs.
Dialectology is connected with sociolinguistics.
Sociolinguistics is the branch of linguistics which studies different aspects of language –phonetics, lexics and grammar with reference to their social function in the society.
Such field of science as sociolinguistics or psycholinguistics are inseparably linked in the treatment of various language structures.
Functional stylistics is a branch of sociolinguistics which studies the distinctive linguistic characteristics of smaller social grouping (occupation, age, sex)

Different types of pronunciation of one and the same language may differ from one another in all the components of its phonetic system.
The inventory of their phonemes may be slightly different that is – they may have phonemes not found in other languages.
Ex. The Scottish variant of English has the phoneme similar to the Russian / x / non-existed in RP and most other types of English pronunciation
Loch - / lox / - озеро
Lock - / lok / - замок
The distribution of those sounds which exist in all several types of pronunciation may also differ.
Thanks to economic, political and social factors one of the local dialects becomes the literary language of the country, and the pronunciation of the dialect becomes an orthoepic standard whereas the pronunciation of the other dialects begin to be regarded as uncultured, illiterate, substandard.
Ex. Russian standard pronunciation (RSP)
2 orthoepic variants^ the difference – in the distribution of their allophones in a small number of words
Msk Leningr
/ш ь : у к ъ / / ш ь ч ь у к ъ /
/ п л а ш ь / / п л а ш ь ч ь /
/ б у л ъ ш н ъ й ъ / / б у л ъ ч н ъ й ъ /
/ м а(домиком) л о ш н ъ й ъ / / м а л о ч н ъ й ъ /

Leningrad variant is spread im large regions of the country so it may be called – Regional variant of the Standard (orthoepic) Pronunciation – variant of standard pronunciation used by educated people as a type of pronunciation which they learn in schools and colleges, from other educated people who use it

III.
British English:
RP
Non-RP accents of England:
Southern accents:
Greater London, Cockney, Kent
East Anglia accents (Northfolk, Sufffolk, Linkolnshire)
South-West accents (Avon, Somerset, Witshire)
Northern and Midland accents:
Northumberland, Durham, Cleveland
Yorkshire accents
North-West accents (Lancashire, Cheshire)
West-Midland (Birmingham, Wolverhampton)
Changes in RP:
A tendency of the diphthongs to be smoothed out, to become shorter: [ei] in the word final position: today, say, may(почему то в транскрипции нет разницы, поэтому написала слова просто)
Diphthongs [ai, a
·] become smoothedwhen they are followed by the neutral sound [
·]: [ta
·, fa
·]
Diphthongs [
·
·,
·
·] tend to be leveled to [
·:]: old speakers: [p
·
·, p
·
·], younger speakers [p
·:, p
·:]
Back-advanced vowels [
·,
·] become fronted in the advanced RP [b
·t - b
·t], [g
·d - g
·d]
Changes in [j+u:], [l+u:]: [sju:t – su:t], [stju:d
·nt – stu:d
·nt]
Devoiced sounds are clearly heard after long vowels and diphthongs as in: deed [di:d]
The voiced/voiceless distinction of the minimal pairs: [sed - set], [d
·g - d
·k] may seem to be lost
Initial “hw”, spread of “dark” [l], glottal stop: [bжt
·mn], [n
·
· kwait], lonking and intrusive [r]: far away, idea of

NON-RP ACCENTS OF ENGLISH: southern, northern and Midland
In vowels
[
·] doesn’t occur in the accents of the north: flood [fl
·d], one [w
·n]
[u:] rather than [
·]: book [b
·k –bu:k]
Before [f,
·, s] [ж] in pronounced instead of [a:] path [pa:
· - pж
·], dance [da:ns - dжns]
IN CONSONANTS:
- The glottal stop is more widely used than in RP. Non-RP speakers use [n] in the suffix “ing” instead of [
·]
- [j] is dropped after [t,s]: student : [stu:d
·nt], in the North after [
·] [
·n`
·u:zi
·zm]
SOUTH ENGLISH ACCENTS
Cockney accent is a social accent the speech of working class of the Greater London:
- [
·] into [жi]: [bl
·d - blжid]
- [i] in word final position as [I:] citi:
- Contrast between [
·] and [f] is lost: thin – [fin], the same between [р] and [v]: weather: [wev
·]
- [
·] into [n]: [da:nsin]

Northern Ireland English
Vowels post vocalic [r] is used in Scotland
e.x. [bird] – [bi:rd]
realisation of [a:] may vary considerably
[ai] [au] are very variable

Consonants: [l] is mainly clear
Intervocalic [t] is often avoiced [d]
e.x. city [sidi]
American English
Vowels: there is no strict division of vowels into long and short in G.A.
Some diphthongs are treated as biphonemic combinations.
The pronunciation of [r] sound between a vowel and a consonant [t
·:rn] – [b
·:rd]
American twang – naslisation of vowels when they are preceeded by a nasal consonsnt.
[j] is omitted between a consonant [u:]
e.x. [nu:z] – [s’tu:dent] [su:t] [
·stu:pid]
Canadian English
Features common with GA on the one hand and with the RP on the other.
Most canadians use the retroflex [r] and dark [l] in all positions and pronounce [ж] in the place of [a:] in words like glass, dance, etc.
Peculiarities of English pronunciation in Australia and New Zealand are still less investigated. Perhaps the most characteristic feature of the Australian and New Zealand types of English pronunciation is the use of the diphthong [
·i] instead of the RP diphthong [ei]
e.x. nation [n
·i
·
·n]
Northern and Midland accents.
In vowels: [
·] in [u] [l
·v] [luv]
[a:] in [ж] [d жns]
[ai] in [ei] [reit]
In consonants: -ing is [in]
[p,t,k] between vowels are accompanied by glottal stop: pity [pit?i]
Yorkshire accents
[
·] in [u]
[a:] in [ж]
-ing is [in]
Welsh English
In vowels: [ж] in [a:] last, dance, chance
no contrast between [
·] and [
·] rubber [r
·b
·]
[
·u] may become monophthong boat [b
·:t]
In consonants: Consonants in intervocalic position particularly when the preceding vowel is short are doubled: city [sitti:]
[l] is clear in all positions
Voiceless plosives tend to be strongly aspirated.
Scottish English.
Vowels: preserves post vocalic [r]: beer [bir]
Monophthongs are pure
[i, u,
·,
·] may be central
Consonants Initial [p,t,k] are usually non-aspirated
[l] is dark in all positions
-ing – [in]

V. as the result of the colonial expansion of British imperialism, the English language spread from the British Isles to all the countries on the earth. English became a national language of several countries – The U.S.A, Australia, New Zealand, and the Republic of South Africa. All the national types of English pronunciation have much in common because they are of the same origin and have a varying number of differences due to the new conditions of their development.

Southern English Pronunciation, Standard English Pronunciation, Received English Pronunciation, Public School Pronunciation or RP.

Each term has its justification as it describes one of the aspects of this type of pronunciation. In 16th century began to acquire an exceptional social prestige in England. Since public schools existed in all parts of the country and prepared their pupils for the universities this type of pronunciation began to be recognized as a characteristic not so much as a regional as a social stratum. Dialect – speaking schoolchildren and university student felt obliged to modify their accent in the direction of the social standard and acquire this type of pronunciation, to the term RP, was introduced by D.Jones, the BBC adopted RP form for its announcers. RP is excepted as e teaching norm in most countries where English is taught as a foreign language.

British Phoneticians (Barber, gimson) estimate that nowadays RP is most homogeneous.

Gimson suggests three main types within RP:
-the conservative RP form (used by the older generation and traditionally by certain profession or social groups.)
-the general RP form (commonly in use by the pronunciation adopted by the BBC)
-the advanced form (mainly used by young people of exclusive social groups – mostly of the upper classes, but also for prestige value in certain professional circles.)


Vll The choice of the type of pronunciation to be taught in schools and colleges of the English speaking countries is determined by their own national standard or standards, teachers and learners of English in countries where it is taught as an SL are faced with the problem of choosing one of the national types of English pronunciation as the teaching norm.

Subjective criteria – one national type of pronunciation is better, more beautiful, and correct than all the others.

Objective criteria – 1) 100 m|a Americans (50 m|a speak with a Southern accent)
2) Geographical, economic, political, military and cultural factors

-the degree of the understability of this or that type of pronunciation in all the English speaking countries.

-the extent to which this or that type has been investigated and the number of textbooks in which it is accurately described and illustrated.

It is necessary in order to: 1) facilitate and accelerate as much as possible the process of teaching and learning.
2) ensure the uniformity of the learner’s pronunciation.


-the economy of mental and articulatory effort on the part of the language – learner, which contributes to the attainment of a better quality of pronunciation in a shorter period of time

-the criterion of maximum understandability applied in choosing a type of pronunciation as the teaching norm.


Заголовок 115

Приложенные файлы

  • doc 18913733
    Размер файла: 239 kB Загрузок: 0

Добавить комментарий